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Educator Resources

  • American Journeys – is a tremendous resource of over 17,000 primary source documents about first encounters in America, also has lessons using these documents.
  • American Social History Project - based at the University of New York Graduate Center and produces print, visual, and multimedia materials about the men and women whose actions and beliefs shaped U.S. history.
  • Annenberg Classroom and Sunnylands Classroom offer classroom-ready civics education resources from the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania and the Annenberg Foundation Trust at Sunnylands at no cost. A rich set of teaching aids on the Constitution helps educators and government employees meet the requirement of the Byrd Amendment to provide materials on the U.S. Constitution for Constitution Day (September 17).
  • Beyond the Bubble - It is part of the Library of Congress's Teaching with Primary Sources Educational Consortium.  The site uses primary resources to "go beyond the bubble" by offering easy-to-use assessments that capture students' knowledge in action - rather than simply testing their recall of discrete facts.  It is great for anyone who is teaching American history or working with NHD kids on U.S. topics.  Additionally, the assessments are aligned with the Common Core.
  • Center for History and New Media – is a clearinghouse for high quality resources in teaching history. Supported by the Department of Education a collaborative effort by George Mason University, the American Social History Project, and the Center for Media and Learning.
  • Chronicling America -is a partnership between the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Library of Congress to bring over 5 million pages of digitzed historic newspapers currently from 28 states and the District of Columbia.
  • Colonial Williamsburg Learning Resources - highlights uncommon classroom resources from early American history with lesson plans and historical background for teachers.
  • Digital History – provides digitized primary sources and tested classroom lessons.
  • DoHistory –is an excellent site that models for students how to use different sources to piece together the past.
  • EDSITEment -NEH's digital outreach to K-12 educators, has a dedicated page on its website with introductory videos, lesson plans, and other features.
  • EDSITEment & Chronicling America -In partnership with NEH, The Chronicling America website provides free access to over 5 million pages of select digitized historic newspapers published between 1836 and 1922.
  • Evaluation of Information Sources – is a collection of evaluation forms for evaluating websites, sources, and surveys while doing research.
  • The Gilder Lehrman Insitute of American History
  • Helping Your Child Learn History - developed by the U.S. Department of Education to help parents work with younger students and history but does include useful language in talking about history education and interesting lessons.
  • History Channel Classroom – contains a variety of lesson plans and other resources from one of our major sponsors.
  • History Matters - from the American Social History Project and the Center for History and New Media with a digital blackboard section that is excellent.
  • Learning Page of the Library of Congress – models how to use primary sources and do oral history with your students plus a 1000 other teacher resources.
  • National Archives: The Digital Classroom - includes downloadable primary sources for different units, detailed lessons with critical questions to ask students to uncover historical meaning.
  • National Center for History in the Schools - has the National History Standards developed by a team lead by Gary Nash at UCLA.
  • National Endowment for the Humanities
  • Our Documents – includes 100 actual milestone documents in American history and transcriptions.
  • PBS History - hundreds of lessons and activities all correlated to state curriculum standards.
  • Social Studies Lesson Plans and Resources - links to lesson plans, ideas, and activities.
  • TeacherServe from the National Humanities Center - includes primary sources, lesson ideas and essays by leading scholars.
  • Teaching with Historic Places - uses properties listed in the National Park Service's National Register of Historic Places to enliven history, social studies, geography, civics, and other subjects. TwHP has created a variety of products and activities that help teachers bring historic places into the classroom.
  • U.S. Department of Education Resources Information Center - ERIC abstracts
  • U.S. Postal Museum - a specific website to connect with National History Day and the history of the Post Office.
  • WebQuest Page - a WebQuest is an inquiry-oriented lesson format in which most or all the information that learners work with comes from the web. This website includes lessons and ideas on how to use the Web for classes and student research projects.
  • What So Proudly We Hail - a civic education initiative that uses literature to teach students about the American character. Includes discussion guides; video conversations; a searchable library of short stories, historica documents, and songs; and resources on the American holidays.
  • What So Proudly We Hail - Birthday of Martin Luther King Jr. - an e-book anthology for Martin Luther King Jr. Day. The book combines readins on the history of the holiday, the black experience during segregation, the goals and strategies of the Civil Rights Movement, and some remaining challenges for today and tomorrow. Each selection includes an introduction by the Kasses with guilding questions for discussion.
  • What So Proundly We Hail - Letter on the Civil Rights Movement - a never-before published letter from Leon Kass about his and Amy Kass's work with the Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi during the summer of 1965.
  • Women In World History Curriculum - full of information and resources to help teachers and students learn about women's history in a global context.
  • You Be the Historian - from the National Museum of American History. Has ideas for lessons in helping students do historical research.